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The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse.
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Joined: Dec 14 2018
Posts: 96

I called my not so local LR dealer to confirm that us P38 owners in the US cannot buy a new key FOB. His info was the manufacturer who made the FOBs stopped making them. He could make me a standard key for about $30-provided I showed proof of ownership.

I then asked him if I provided the ownership papers he required to cut me a standard key could he use them to tell me what my EKA and FOB codes are. He told me that as far as he knows- and he has asked LR US this question due to other P38 customers asking the same- that the US P38's were never issued EKA codes. If a customer's car got into a superlock down (he called it something else which I cannot recall) that they would have to use the dealer's Testbook to open up the car and shut off the immobilizer. As of today his dealership no longer has a testbook so a P38 owner in this situation is up a creek.

So how bogus is this info from the head of parts who says he has been with LR since the Classic was on the showroom floor?

If you end up having only a stock key for a 2000 P38 after your FOB dies should you never lock your doors with it? Is straight key only safe to start and drive the P38?

I find all this hard to believe since most every thread on lockout always mentions using the EKA code first- and if not working check the micro switches.

Last-- if my only FOB dies and if I cannot get my EKA from a dealer-- how do I use my NANO to get my P38 up and running provided I have NOT locked the BECM?

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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Marty (or Sloth) will hopefully pop up and answer this one but I was under the impression that if a BeCM wasn't programmed with an EKA, all you had to do was turn the key to lock 4 times then to unlock. The 4 turns is how you put the car into EKA accept mode and then enter the code, with no code you just put it into that mode and it does the job. The other story, which may or may not have any truth, is that there was a default NAS EKA of 1515.

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Joined: Jan 16 2017
Posts: 499

If you look at the NAS spec copy of RAVE, and compare it to the non-NAS one, there doesn't appear to be any mention of the EKA on the NAS spec owners handbook on the sections its mentioned in the non-NAS ones (the bit about entering it as far as I can see isn't even there, mentions of it being on the security card aren't present either).

I suspect (but don't know) that NAS fobs would use a different frequency, hence they might well not be available if they aren't being made anymore.

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
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I was under the impression that the keys are available here, but they come from the states, I will have a look for that discussion, the guy got a number 3 key, he gave me the dealer details but I’ve filed it somewhere

Found the dealer, Gordon lamb in chesterfield

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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It is a frequency thing, NAS fobs operate on 315 MHz compared with most of the rest of the world that uses 433 MHz (315 is in the middle of the military air band here). I suspect that while 433 MHz fobs are still available 315 MHz ones aren't.

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Joined: Jan 16 2017
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Gilbertd wrote:

It is a frequency thing, NAS fobs operate on 315 MHz compared with most of the rest of the world that uses 433 MHz (315 is in the middle of the military air band here). I suspect that while 433 MHz fobs are still available 315 MHz ones aren't.

I was hoping you'd post something along those lines, as that was what I was suspecting would be different, but you've also given the why its different explanation.

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It isn't only key fobs. I've spent the last 2 days on a USAF base here in the UK chasing radio equipment operating on frequencies that are OK to use in the States but not here. The problem is that the US has land borders with nobody other than Canada (who have to follow the US) and Mexico (that they don't care about) so allocate the radio spectrum how they see fit which is, unfortunately, differently to everywhere else. As radio waves don't know about country boundaries, we have to coordinate with Western Europe who have to coordinate with Eastern Europe who have to coordinate with Russia and the Middle East and so on. It was something that caused no end of problems in the first Gulf War where US and other, non-US forces, were unable to communicate as the radios they had weren't compatible.