rangerovers.pub
The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse.
Member
Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1122

So I know I can read faults in hevac ect on all p38 models, can I read them on models that I don’t have any engine codes, ie l322, 405 ect

Member
Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 397

Nanocom can basically read anything that the appropriate unlock code is installed for. Looks like no code available for the 405 but it can do the later 210-2013 L322. Can't do the earlier L322 tho'. Presumably because that is terrible mis-mash of BMW and Ford systems.

Clive

Member
avatar
Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 3588

As well as needing the unlock codes for other models for some you need a different cable too. Tried using mine of a Disco 3 and it didn't want to know. Checked with BBS and found that it will connect but only with the correct cable. Hardly anything can talk to the 2002-2010 L322.

Member
avatar
Joined: Jan 05 2016
Posts: 942

The earlier L322 is based on E39 5 series and E53 X5 - I thought you could use INPA to talk to a lot of it? I've got said INPA for that era, but never played with an L322.

Member
Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1122

Didn’t realise it can’t talk to early 322s, not that I plan on playing with one, thanks for info guys

Member
Joined: Nov 16 2016
Posts: 789

Just LPG converted an L322 with BMW motor (well, finished it on Wednesday but the owner isn't collecting til tomorrow).
The owner had a mobile mechanic come to look at it today (Fri) because his brake warning lights are on. He's just had new brake pads fitted, the warning lights came on straight after that. I had to pop out for half an hour whilst the mobile mechanic was here (step daughter in labour so some running people around to do), when I got back the mobile bloke reckoned the fault was just that the new pads didn't have the necessary brake light warning connection on osr and possibly also on the nsf. He reckoned he'd tried twisting the wires together but that didn't prevent the warning light (but I'm not sure he did anything to get dirty as he looked immaculate when he arrived and looked immaculate when I came back). Anyway.. He used a tablet style Snap-On code reader to see the fault codes and could get into most modules with it. He advised the owner to take it back to the people who fitted the brake pads. Not sure why the owner even hired him tbh.

Member
Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 397

Staying OT

The L322 should come with a "Mechanics Metal Health Warning" and a special access code to stop folks what don't know what they are doing and are too rat arsed lazy to read the manual laying a spanner or fault code reader on them.

Section 70-40-02 in the manual, page 70-16 says right at the top in special pay attention print ".......If pad wear warning light has been activated, sensor must be renewed." Can't get plainer than that can you.

As I understand it the sensor clips on the pad. Its plastic case wears down along with the pads. Once the case is worn away a wire is exposed which in turn wears down breaking the circuit and bringing the warning light on.

Same system is found on a fair few other cars I believe so summat Mr Mobile Mechanic should have known about. As should the folk who changed the pads. Sensor is about £20 a pop from Brit-Car - Island - LRDirect et al including the official Green Oval Tax methinks.

I'm sooo glad I run a nice simple, reliable & cheap to fix P38.

Clive

Member
Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1509

That's the same system BMW used on their E30 back in the 80s - it shouldn't really be a surprise for a "Professional"

Member
Joined: Nov 16 2016
Posts: 789

He was a young lad with a shiny new Snap On scan tool, I have to wonder if he'd rather just plug that in and charge for some 'report' than do much dirty hands on work.

I don't think I've worked on brakes where wear sensors are separate from brake pads but don't doubt they exist.
He reckoned his supposed twisting wires together probably didn't work (to turn off the warning light) because the sensor has a built in resistor. Shrugged and said he was going when I suggested that in that case he could prevent the warning light by wiring in a resistor. Probably sees his scan tool and writing diagnostic reports as easier than actually changing brake pads.. but to be fair I reckon his report will have been accurate even if an unnecessary expense for the owner. The owner reckoned the brakes were binding but they didn't seem to be binding when I drove it and the wheel(s) etc didn't get warm... mind you I noticed the osr tyre was a bit deflated so I blew it up ;-)

Member
Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1122

You’ve got to remember 99% of mechanics nowadays can’t rebuild anything, they have a posh name of motor technicians, which translated means I MIGHT be able to change your bulb, unless of course it means unscrewing anything,, I only replace like for like, i can’t do it if it means I might get my hands dirty,,

Member
Joined: Mar 26 2016
Posts: 309

Two cars ago, I swopped my trusty 38 for a L322. Massive mistake!! Eleven months later I p/x'd it for the silver 38 that Gilbert had off me. I lost a lot of money on that 322 :o(, about £4k.
If anything electrical could go wrong on it, it did. In the end, I used to have to take fuse 18 out at night so the thing would start the next day. Never felt a bit of guilt trading it in to a dealer.

Member
Joined: Sep 13 2016
Posts: 473

From owning my E90, which has similar clip in brake pad sensors, once the brake warning is triggered you need to prod some buttons on the dash to clear it, even after you've replaced the sensors (or twisted the wires together, which worked perfectly well on mine). If you try to reset the warning without changing the sensors, the "brake pad warning" gets replaced with a "visit workshop" warning instead. But either warning will still clear by simply fixing the sensors, and going thru the reset motions on the dash stalk. No diagnostic kit required.