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The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse.
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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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Earlier versions didn't have it but the air filter air intake was next to the exhaust manifold to raise the temperature of the incoming air. It isn't at a cold start where it does anything, it's once you get moving. If the ambient temperature is below or slightly above freezing, the incoming air is accelerated through the throttle body so cools down further. If it is damp, such as on a foggy day, the moisture in the incoming air freezes and blocks the intake or jams your throttle. Which is why people have had problems when cruising, cold, damp air going in, being cooled by the acceleration and turning to a block of ice inside the throttle body.

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Joined: Sep 12 2018
Posts: 39

Marshall8p ... about the glow plug or any other unused symbol, I had a look at my spare and training instrument cluster from a Thor engined late V8, there is no glow plug symbol or any other unused one.
I will check that and report in a few days, when I installed the warning LED and buzzer in my GEMS V8.
In the case You don't have a spare symbol it is possible to "scratch" an individual symbol in the cluster, there are spare positions for warning lamps, but blanked out (read non-transparent).
I wanted to have the symbol understandable in the case someone drives my car, without me ... so I've tried a double wave with a triangle pointed downwards in combination with a red LED. Together with a buzzer everyone told me, they understand some kind of low level, which indicates stop driving and switching of the engine. Understandable enough for the purpose.

Funny finding, I don't know where I read that, but the possible error messages in the BECM / cluster display had the programming for low coolant level, but somewhere between specifying the features of the P38 and final production realisation, this feature got lost. As an long term Range Classic driver I liked that feature of a low coolant warning light very much. It saved me at least two engines in almost 20 Years, whereas the temp gauge in my first P38 reacted too late (I guess) when a hose busted with 180 Km/h on the highway. I stopped at once and refilled with water, but afterwards the engine had a bug, which resulted in wrecking the car at the end. Now I have a very nice P38 I want to avoid that kind of failure risk, so an somewhat over engineered low coolant warning feature is worth the effort IMHO ... YMMV ;-)

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Joined: Sep 12 2018
Posts: 39

Update ... lucky me has an instrument cluster with the red "service engine" warning lamp, unused in Europe (it´s for US / CAN if memory serves me correct).
So I went for this. A red light with this text and an unbearable piezo buzzer of enough noise to be hearable even if You listen to Prodigy makes me feel a bit more relaxed now while driving ;-)
Only thing which I underestimated was the routing of the wires ... took much more time than I expected. But less than taking the whole dash apart.
A sturdy wire for pulling the loom makes installation much easier.
Instead of Gilbertd´s good and friendly advice, I took the power of the cigarette lighter, was easier with the electric components I had, than hacking into the genuine wiring loom. No cutting involved, in theory it´s even removable without traces ...

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Joined: Feb 25 2020
Posts: 209

Good progress then!
I will update on mine once I resolve the TBH matter ...

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Joined: Sep 12 2018
Posts: 39

leolito THX ;-)
about the TBH, You might have already discovered Yourself, but when I researched options for the level sensor, the TBH problem (or missing connection) with the V8 engined cars was addressed. They went either for other tanks, or cut the hoses and put T-pieces in them. IIRC Thor and GEMS have some different layouts of hoses and some other flow directions of coolant in details.
Otherwise You can get another V8 header tank and put a sensor Yourself in that. Thats was my first idea, when I already had found and bought a sensor and a second hand unit for training installation, I found the plug and play solution from Alisport. Buying a Diesel was a another option, but then I would just end up with two P38 #rofl #scnr

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Joined: Sep 12 2018
Posts: 39

leolito THX ;-)
about the TBH, You might have already discovered Yourself, but when I researched options for the level sensor, the TBH problem (or missing connection) with the V8 engined cars was addressed. They went either for other tanks, or cut the hoses and put T-pieces in them. IIRC Thor and GEMS have some different layouts of hoses and some other flow directions of coolant in details.
Otherwise You can get another V8 header tank and put a sensor Yourself in that. Thats was my first idea, when I already had found and bought a sensor and a second hand unit for training installation, I found the plug and play solution from Alisport. Buying a Diesel was a another option, but then I would just end up with two P38 #rofl #scnr

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Joined: Sep 12 2018
Posts: 39

BTW If You have a Diesel and go the way the BMW tank, like Dave3d, the level sensor looks the same as the RR Classic ones before 90s model year, with metal expansion tanks. Parts number PRC5077. I remember, that it was known that BMW uses the same sensor ... just to make confusion perfect ;-)
They seem to have the same supplier contracted ... it works with a magnet and a reed contact as opener, which I really liked. The lamp would indicate if the wire is broken, too ;-)
But a lot of used RRC I had a look at, had them shorted ... guess why ;-)

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Joined: Feb 25 2020
Posts: 209

No, buying a Diesel not an option! :-)
I will think of a T arrangement somehow. In any case it is not critical at the time ...