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Hello,
I wanted to refurbish my EAS valve block and the compressor piston & seal.
I have the material here (X8R) and there are many good manuals around. But they never say how long it takes approx.
How much time should I calculate for this ? Would like to know so I can forsee how long the Range will be out of order sinve I use it every day... 3-4 hours ?
I have never done it before but have all the tools and am crafty enough to know what I am doing (hopefully :-)).
greetings,
Max.

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First time then 3-4 hours from start to finish is reasonable. The secret is to be patient, methodical/systematic and employ extreme cleanliness.

Having refurbished the EAS valve block a few times now I can probably do it in half that time. However, I treat the valve block as a preventative maintenance item so have a spare that I refurbish ready to swap in. When I refurbish the valve block I also thoroughly clean the block itself when completely stripped down which involves a couple of hours in the dishwasher and overnight drying in the nice warm airing cupboard.

When reinstalling always, always make sure the ends of the air pipes are clean and smooth to avoid damaging the newly installed o rings.

Refurbishing the compressor takes 15 minutes or so once it’s out and on the bench. Again, I have a spare that I refurbish as a ready use spare. Inserting the piston and new seal into the cylinder is one of those techniques that once acquired takes seconds but learning the technique can take some time! It is important to make sure the grub screw engages correctly and firmly on the machined flat face on rebuilding. Cleanliness is essential - I once allowed some FOD ingress during one refurbishment and the compressor was toast within a week or so requiring another complete refurbishment.

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Perfect. Thanks for the hints !

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Biggest time saver is getting yourself properly organised before you start.

Separate places, with labels, for the new O rings et al organised by what goes where and similar places for the old parts being replaced and things being removed and refitted as part of the process to go. Not forgetting places to keep the screws in order.

Obviously fairly detailed notes / labels as to whats what, where it goes and which side of the block you will be working on.

I suspect that sorting a proper notes and places system is a almost as effective a learning tool as doing your first one. Likely to take an hour tho'.

I'm fairly methodical but wasted ages first time through with an O ring and "did I / didn't I" mix up. Primarily due to thinking that simply laying out on the bench would be good enough. Not quite. Most likely due to disorientation when flicking between the how to notes printed off the internet, the block and the bits being taken off / put on. Once I'd lost my place in the sequence trying to figure out exactly where I was at was hard.

Got a check off list for doing the brakes for similar reasons.

Clive

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A few further tips:

  1. Mobile phone is your friend for taking photos at each stage as you disassemble - they are invaluable for referring to when reassembling. Particularly which way the non-return valves and diaphragm go.

  2. Use a marker pen to number the solenoids as they are removed with a simple diagram of which number goes where.

  3. I find it less confusing to disassemble and immediately reassemble each solenoid in turn.

  4. When refitting the pressure switch don’t forget to ‘unwind’ the wires to it a few revolutions before screwing it back into the block.

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These are great hints, guys.
I guess I´ll try not to do it when I have to finish in a certain amount of time !

I also though of doing one valve at a time to avoid any confusion.
Any drawbacks with that other than not being able to clean the whole block through at once ?

I also noticed that the insulation of the orange wire that leads to the compressor has melted a bit and the connector also a bit melted and black. What does that mean ?

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?? The orange wire is the one connected to the thermal switch so doesn't carry any current at all, just a link to ground on the black wire. The compressor motor is on the green and black.

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By doing the solenoids one at a time I meant number them, then remove them all from the block and then complete the refurbishment of each solenoid one at a time. As they are numbered it should be possible (with a simple diagram) to get them back in the right position after the valve block has been cleaned. I number the solenoids with a white marker pen all on the same side when looking at the assembled valve block and the take a photo of it. That way even a simple diagram isn’t required - just refer to the photo when rebuilding; it also ensures the orientation and wiring routes are maintained.

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SInce I heard that some of the latest X8R O-Ring kits do not fit I have postponed my block rebuild.
Luckily I heard about it before starting, that would have left my car unusable for an unknown amount of time....especially since the alternative companies are all not in Germany,,,,
I have written X8R to clarify if my set is also affected but no answer....

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As I understand it, and will admit I have had one that didn't seat properly so leaked, it is only the very thing ones that go on the top of the solenoid plunger. In the kit they are marked as Solenoid plunger seal and there are 7 of them. They are about the only ones that don't leak and the ones where you need to take to actual valve apart (two little Philips head screws), if you are concerned, then don't strip the valves to change them.