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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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Folks, the Duches started to look a bit pissed! She has moaned about "LH R sensor out of range" three times in a week and when she's parked up she's very high at the rear left and low on the front right.

The EAS goes up and down OK but starting from access height everything is level. By the time you get to normal, there's definitely a lean (measured the lazy way by comparing the bonnet line with lines of bricks on a wall)
Should I just replace the LHR sensor and recalibrate? or are there any other tricks?
Also... I need to get some calibration blocks :( Are they sold anywhere - I don't have any tools up to cutting that much Nylon!

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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OK, I see Island 4x4 sell them FOR £130!!!!
Maybe it's time to get a decent saw!

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
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I’m sure if you ask around, one of your friends will have a chop saw, if not send rods to me and I’ll cut them

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I got the 30mm nylon rod from a supplier on eBay and cut them with a standard hacksaw. Dulls the teeth a bit and I went through 3 blades but does the job nicely.

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Joined: Jun 16 2018
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Hi All,
If you do get nylon 30mm bar and have the means to cut it, what are the measurements for length that you need to cut and how do you use them to then calibrate the suspension? Sorry if this is in RAVE but it's too hot lol

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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no10chris wrote:

I’m sure if you ask around, one of your friends will have a chop saw, if not send rods to me and I’ll cut them

That's a kind offer!
But, if I google Chop Saw I seem for half the price of a set of rods. More tools is better, right? :)

But, this is a bit of a ballache if I have to make a set of calibration blocks before I can change the height sensor. What's the worst that can happen if I just change the sensor?

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oilmagnet477 wrote:

Hi All,
If you do get nylon 30mm bar and have the means to cut it, what are the measurements for length that you need to cut and how do you use them to then calibrate the suspension? Sorry if this is in RAVE but it's too hot lol

The process is in RAVE but it involves using Testbook which you won't have. You'll need either a Nanocom or the free RSW EASUnlock program to read and write the numbers. Block sizes are here https://www.rangerovers.net/forum/7-range-rover-mark-ii-p38/73321-eas-calibration-blocks.html

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1963

OK. so from the darkside:
Front
High Profile 140mm
Standard profile 100mm
Low Profile 75mm
Access Profile 35mm

Rear
High Profile145mm
Standard Profile105mm
Low Profile 80mm
Access Profile 40mm

Which I make 1050mm of 30mm delrin assuming perfect 0 loss cuts. Call it 1100mm :)
Sounds like I could make my own set for less than Island charge and come out ahead by one chop saw....

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Joined: Jun 16 2018
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Thanks for that - logged for future reference.
Not sure if my Hawkeye total allows for that level of 'interference'

Have a great weekend

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Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 474

Have you checked that the joints in the coupling to the suspension move freely.

My fronts were playing up a bit but when sorting the radius arm bushes I found the pivot pins on the radius arms were well corroded with serious flaking. Made some new stainless ones and fitted with red rubber grease in the connectors. Sorted. Not convinced my back pivots are as good as it could be but thats a job for another day.

Delrin or nylon is a pain to handsaw accurately. Parting off on a lathe works best for a neat, accurate, job. Looks like best value on t'bay at the moment is 2500 mm of 30 mm Ø delrin for near as dammitt £41 delivered. Which will do two sets. I need to do a set for myself so if Morat wants to go halves I'll knock out two sets and send one up. Left over 400 mm will always come in handy. Can easily do more sets whilst I'm set up if folk want.

Clive

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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I'd be up for a set. I made some awhile ago... but found after started cutting it that they'd sent me 20mm, not 30mm... And they don't stick in the bumpstops very well! Been meaning to get a 30mm set at some point, but still haven't got around to it.

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
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Morat wrote:
>

Sounds like I could make my own set for less than Island charge and come out ahead by one chop saw....

As long as you don’t gain a saw, but lose your fingers, lol

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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Yeah, I'll be careful!! Apparently Delrin cuts like wood so I should be OK with the chop saw I bought.

Marty, I got my Delrin from here
https://www.directplastics.co.uk/delrin-rod

If I still have 10 fingers by next weekend I'm sure we could work something out :)

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Joined: Sep 14 2016
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Morat
Use the clamps both sides of the cut when using a chop saw. Usual chop saw blade and speeds are rather too aggressive for Delrin so it can get bit lively during the process. Doesn't help that the stuff is smooth and slippery making it hard to hold with one hand. If you have some excess material best to have a couple of practice goes to get the right rate of cut. Pushing the saw through too slow or too fast will both give poor results.

Although you can cut it with woodworking tools it certainly doesn't cut like wood. As with all plastics it cuts like, well, plastic. Worst thing when using ordinary tools is getting a neat end and shifting the fluffy bits round the edge. Miles better than high density polythene tho' which is a total bear.

Clive

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Valuable advice! Thanks :)

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
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I’d be tempted to clamp it miles, chop saws can be unforgiving buggers, I’ve used them for the past 35-40yrs, I would hold it, but I’d hate for you to have an accident, if they catch it can throw the piece out your hand , and your hand will go wherever, my neighbour asked to borrow my 9” rip saw, I just looked at him and said no, most dangerous tool on any site, that bugger can jump..

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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Clamping sounds good!

Clive, I missed your offer :( Thanks for that, but I guess I'm committed now...
The saw I've bought is more of a Mitre Saw (I had no idea of the difference when I bought it)
DeDigitiser
So I'll be able to cut angles in the future, should I ever need to.
It has a clamp on one side of the blade, I'll see what I can do with a G-Clamp on the other. If I'm really scared I'll see if I can get hold of some U bar with a >30mm channel and clamp that down on top of the rod. It depends on what the actual saw looks like when I get hold of it.

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Joined: Sep 14 2016
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That saw looks excellent value. Pity they cheaped out by only providing one clamp although there are four receptacles for it in the base. Looks pretty much like the SIP one I got 14 years ago to build my workshop. They all seem to use the same design of base casting. But I got two clamps.

Frequently a bit more controllable to make cut by bringing the head down and sliding it rather than a vertical chop. I often use a combined movement to reduce the chance of lifting but thats not a novice technique as getting it wrong can make things worse.

Clamp the part to be cut firmly down into the corner between base and fence. Use a stop to set the length as there is no satisfactory way of marking the stuff. Measure twice cut once of course.

If you have a set of grip palm work gloves, either leather or PU faced cloth, you may be able to hold the main body down into the corner between fence and base. Use the heel of your hand. Not your thumb! Cut the longer spacers first. Free end will dance around quite wildly until you get it down to 500 mm or so. It will almost certainly try to escape as the cut goes through. Just had a quick play holding some offcuts down on mine. 40 mm Ø no problem, 25 mm Ø too small, no 30 mm Ø to try. Depends on your hand size and how well your gloves fit. I have small hands and use the stretchy PU faced cloth work gloves from LiDL. Cheap, comfy and made in my size.

Of course having done a couple or three sets got the knack and nailed down what it feels like when all is going well you'd dump the clamp(s) and do it free hand. Like wot Chris does and as I would. Albeit with a block of wood having a Vee out of one corner to help hold the material down.

Last thing. Chop / mitre saws are really, really noisy. I pretty much levitated first time I turned mine on!

Clive

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
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Woohoo, his first saw, and it’s a radial arm with compound, go miles,, lol,,
Your have fun with that,, I’ve got the same, just bigger, does pretty much anything you need, , were soon have you doing double compound mitres, lol

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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'kin ell it's MASSIVE
After all the warnings I'm scared to take it out of the box!!! :)