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The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse.
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Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1180

Naw, that’s only got either a 7 or 9 inch blade, I think a 7”, mines got a 12” blade,if you’ve got any 2x1 laying around, have a few practice cuts to get used to it,

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Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 446

Once you get used to the noise it'll be a proper pussy-cat. Just make sure its tied down properly before you use it and that you have firm footing. Like (nearly) all machines you just have to be firm and confident to show it who is the boss.

Clive

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

I've bought a stand for it. £55 to save fingers seems like a good idea. I won't be clamping that thing down on the kitchen table :)

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1180

I’m so so on the stands, I’ve had the big flip over saw ( goes from chop to bench )
Had the extending bed for putting 8x4 sheets through on you own, but with the radius arm I normally just plonk it on the floor,
As the stuff your cutting is small I wouldn’t of bothered with a stand.

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

I'm sure you're right for most cases but I don't have a bench and the floor of the Garage is full. So, really the bench is to let me work outside on an extension cable. The next job after the calibration blocks will be lots of shelves and batons. We've moved into a new build with plenty of cupboards but they've just got bare walls so everything is sitting on the floor!
I see many plasterboard fixings in my future, quite a contrast from drilling into a 3ft stone/rubble wall.

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Joined: Jan 05 2016
Posts: 1029

Morat wrote:

...so everything is sitting on the floor!
I see many plasterboard fixings in my future...

Followed by everything sitting on the floor again 5 minutes later :) Bloody plasterboard fixings

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 4340

I've found these work best as long as the weight is downwards https://www.screwfix.com/p/easyfix-self-drill-plasterboard-fixings-metal-32mm-100-pack

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Joined: Nov 16 2016
Posts: 975

Years ago one of my mates did a carpentry course, the teacher was using a circular or band saw to cut sheets of wood whilst giving a bit of a talk on it. Must have been distracted because whilst talking he fed the wood in a bit far and cut about an inch into the bit between his thumb and finger but didn't even notice until the youths said 'Errr your thumb mate', then he nearly fainted. Apparently that was a good lesson lol.

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

I Think I'm going to put vertical supports in each corner of the cupboard, screw them to the wall using plasterboard fittings for some stability but have the weight reach the floor. Then I'll attach the shelves to the verticals. I might put batons all the way round as well. Essentially, I'm a lazy sod and I hate doing things twice!

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1180

The cone type plaster board fixings are pretty good, I’ve used both metal and plastic type.
If your screwing brackets ( example, kitchen cupboards) I use the metal ones, if Your screwing through timber, use the plastic ones, as your not limited to using the screws supplied.
Depending on what your putting up, there are others that when put through the plaster board, you have a tool that pulls it tight at the back and front, there neat and solid as..

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Molly-Metal-Anchor-Wall-Plug-Setting-Fixing-Tool-20-M4-plugs-for-Plasterboard/331294914372?epid=1063214138&hash=item4d22b73744:g:PM0AAOSw7NNT8xbO

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

Handy! Thanks Chris. If I have any spare I'll see if they hold the dog guard brackets in the roof of the P38 :)

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1180

No reason why they wouldn’t, might need a bit of spacing behind ( washers or timber) as they don’t close tight together, they need the plaster board for grip, but they are neat and tidy, extremely strong,

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

I have fingers!! Still!!
And also most of a set of EAS blocks.
Sadly I didn't allow for the minimum length of delrin I need to be able to clamp it down, and I cocked my first attempt at a 105mm block which left me short of material.
However, I've got the High, Standard and the rear Low blocks done safely.

My very helpful neighbour (also a work colleague) was a bit of a picture when I rang his doorbell and asked him if he had any spare wood so I could make a stop block for my new Mitre Saw. Clearly, the thought of the IT Guy being let loose with something like that horrified him so he came round and made sure I was being sensible :) His verdict on my saw was very positive. Apparently the one at work doesn't have such refinements as a blade guard or even a sharp blade...

Delrin cuts like butter! but it's like clamping soap.

I was just getting tempted to hold the rod by hand to get the 35mm cuts out of my scrap pieces when I realised I was about to be dick and decided to order more Delrin instead...

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

ERr, I deleted a second post and I think I broke the db again :(

Anyway, I linked to the wrong saw earlier. I've actually got a Titan saw (Screwfix own brand?) for £95. It doesn't have the laser or a calibrated fence which is a bit of a PITA but a bit of measuring and a stop block solves that. The good news is that is has a 48 tooth blade instead of the 22 tooth blade on the Evolution I linked to, so the cuts are pretty darn smooth.

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Joined: Feb 02 2018
Posts: 212

I used an angle grinder and 2 x B&Q clamps to hold it down. I had molten plastic and spiders webs all over the kitchen hahahaha. Wife was not happy

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Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 446

Morat
If you've not ordered more Delrin yet drop the offcuts in the post to me and I'll trim them to length on one of the lathes. Only need about 1/8" for parting tool so could get the two 35 mm ones out of a 75 mm length in perfect safety. Even easier if you have two pieces longer than 35 mm.

Clive

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

Damnit! another 500mm showed up today. Thanks for the offer though. Do you want my offcuts for anything?

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

Mukiwa wrote:

I used an angle grinder and 2 x B&Q clamps to hold it down. I had molten plastic and spiders webs all over the kitchen hahahaha. Wife was not happy

Damnit, where's the LIKE button :)

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1180

As you’ve got plenty to spare, mark the cut, double check it, now this is the training bit, if right handed, hold the Delrin in left hand, press it to saw guide with your thumb, your now ready to cut it.
Remember that the cut is to the left of the mark, otherwise you will be short the blade thickness.
The trick is, your left hand is more important than the cut, if that stays put, the cutting is easy...
Those of us that used them daily don’t even think about it, but then I’m shite on a computer,
We’re have you a carpenter yet, but I guarantee you won’t have me a comp tech, lmao

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1862

I'll definitely do that when I move onto project #2 - Shelving!
In the meantime, the delrin is really slippery and I want a good smooth finish so I'm using a stop block for the measurement and a clamp on the "long" side. If I take about 2s to make the cut the blade leaves a really nice edge. Then I let the blade spin down to a stop before raising the saw because otherwise the teeth mark up the Delrin.

Then I spend 20 minutes with the hoover chasing plastic snow before the dogs get to it!