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Joined: Dec 14 2018
Posts: 93

And the drip drip drip of new bits to fix progresses forward.

I have the classic coolant drip from the motor side hose (input) to the throttle body heater plate.

I can repair--I can bypass with a U union---or I can remove the whole system by plugging the hose at the top of the block and at the bottom of the coolant reservoir.

As far as repairing--- I went simple and tried a new hose clamp and it still pushes coolant up the nipple then drips along the outside of the hose--so I assume that the hose is now deformed/crushed enough from the original clamp that a new hose clamp is chasing the wind.

Is it safe to assume that it is only the hose since I see no drips coming from the seal at the plate-- or does the nipple eventually crack and a new hose will not do the trick. Is this one of those cases when you just go forward and replace both hoses and the plate?

We can only get the plate and the hose out of the top of the block- and they are cheap. LR no longer offers the line back to the reservoir and I have read that the plastic line gets fragile and will crack. If you do the repair should you remove it and replace with long rubber line to avoid a possible catastrophe?

How many have opted to just run a U union and take the chances with the plastic line?

How many have just plugged the system at the top of the block and at the reservoir?

I am open to all options.

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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Most of us have taken the plate off and resealed it, then replaced the two hoses with 8mm ID single ply reinforced silicon tube. This is the stuff most of us have used http://www.autosiliconehoses.com/8mm-silicone-1-ply-radiator-heater-hose-1-metre-to-50-metres-blue-black.html. The only problem with it is the supplier who is often out of stock. You might have better luck finding it in the US.

If you decide to bypass the throttle body heater, a U tube is better than blanking the ends as the feed from the top of the engine also allows and air locks to find their way back to the header tank.

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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Gilbert--- in short-- you kept the heater system functional by assuring the plate does not leak and running new silicon hoses in place of the original.

I assume that replacing the hoses using OEM style is not the road to go down due to repro quality issues of replacement hoses now available through the ususally suspects or Ebay. (On Ebay US a few suppliers are selling what they call OEM replacement hoses for about $90- one set made by Allparts)

I went the link and the hose is described as "A single ply polyester reinforced hose with a working temperature of +200°C"-- I assume strands of polyester embedded in the silicone hose.

I assume that the OD of the silicone reservoir hose will be much larger than the plastic OEM line-- can you still snake the silicone hose down the same original pathway?

I am almost tempted to fabricate a replacement copper or stainless line to follow the same route-- just my anal nature.

GREAT tip---that you pointed out that I could have trouble burping my cooling system if I plug up the system by just using short plugs on the block and at the reservoir.

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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The silicon hose is the same outside diameter as the original bits of rubber hose on each end of the brittle plastic pipe. I can't remember what year your car is but on the pre 99 GEMS, it is too fat to follow exactly the same route as the original where it goes under the alternator so I've routed mine behind it instead. It also has the advantage that it doesn't set rock hard like the original. I have never been able to pull the short hose off the top of the inlet manifold as it seems to weld itself on but the silicon stays nice and flexible.

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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I bypassed my throttle body heater by running that single ply silicon hose direct to the header tank from the top of the engine. It's been fine ever since. I don't know whether you get bad icing conditions in your part of the US but in the UK it's been fine. My question is "how necessary is the throttle body heater?" because it's a poor design and the gasket always fails. Clearly they put it on for a reason, but if that reason was due to testing in a Norwegian Winter I'm not so bothered.

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Joined: Jan 05 2016
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The heater certainly isn't needed in the UK, but the engine is the same in all markets - perhaps with a few oddities like secondary air injection in the states, and running open loop (possibly just GEMS?) in Australia etc.

Mine went a long time ago - I think I might have been the first to use the single ply hose from the ever-unreliable Auto Silicone Hoses on eBay? It's good stuff, and at some point I should try and get some more to have it to hand if I need it on others!

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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I really like the idea of running directly from the top of the block to the reservoir if I am not going to keep the heater functional. I never had a heater on my Astro van so I do not know if it is required-- we get down to the teens and twenties F up here in the mountains.

If I go the route of keeping my heater functional and super sealing with something like Ultra Grey or Four Bond (is this what you guys use???) I will need to run the silicone hoses to the heater block. From the description of the 8mm ID silicone hose I can buy- the outer dimension is 14mm. On my 2000 the plastic line looks no larger than 10 mm-- can you stuff the 14mm under and around the alternator. Reading the dark side threads it seems most members skip following the OEM route and run about 5' of hose around the back side of the motor to the heater block.

I will have to look at that-- does not seem like you can make that very tidy.

What style hose clamps work best for this- the "squeeze tight" style which uses a screw into a threaded hole or the traditional scroll band style. I would use a crimp style band as I use on fuel lines but I do not think I can get my clamping tool down parallel to the block or past the throttle cable pulley.

On another topic--- I tried to add an Avatar and when I click on the Avatar block it will only accept Text- when I click "manage" it opens a Google autofill page for Text only. How do I insert a photo?

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Joined: Jun 16 2018
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Rather than start a new thread - I thought this might be a good place to seek clarification.

I am in the process of doing the heater o rings to hopefully cure a small leak of coolant but today I noticed this and wondered if this is what you are describing here?

2019-7

Is the stain around the join indicative of the same problem or am I looking in the wrong place. When I first got the car I did replace all hoses (but I don't think I did this one). I did the 2 behind the AC compressor if I remember correctly.

Thanks

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1112

No, your looking at a vacumn, the pipe there talking about is under the throttle body, there’s a heater plate, one pipe comes from inlet, other goes back to expansion bottle.
Re your orings, look at PaulP38A.com ( I think ) your get pictures of where to drill hole to get to screw, make sure you have a nice long pz2 screwdriver to hand, makes the job much easier

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Joined: Jun 16 2018
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Thanks for the tip - I am already well versed with PaulP38A - I went through his really helpful site with a fine tooth comb before buying a P38 and it still didn't put me off!

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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Ok-- now the plate is leaking so there are puddles on the valve cover.

I just order 10 feet (cheaper buying a 10' roll then 5' per foot price) of reinforced silicone hose. This gives me the option of running OEM style to a U union in case I find I need a heater in the winter---or using Morat and Chris's tip of just plumbing directly from the top of the block to the reservoir.

I found this U union in my stash-- used in fuel injection systems.

[img]https://i.imgur.com/KAxDxDK.jpg[/img]

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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One more thing-- how much coolant do I need to drop out of the bottom of the radiator in order to install a U union into the existing hoses? Got her pretty nicely bleed these days and would hate to start from scratch.

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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None. Pull the pipes, fit the U union and top up the dribble that you lost.

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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Thanks Gilbert-

You were correct-- just pulled off the lines and inserted my U union.

Here is a photo of my Temporary/semi-permanent/permanent fix. Still have 10' of silicone hose coming.

[img]https://i.imgur.com/S5ocA7R.jpg[/img]

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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Looks fine, you've got the right sort of clips on the hose too.

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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So last time I posted I installed a U union and then bought some silicone heater hose from Amazon. From the specs I thought it was pretty good hose - but then on the dark side, someone posted to buy only the superduty silicone hose due to some unspecified catastrophe he experience with "cheap' silicone hose. Mine has a 0.11 wall thickness and the superduty has a wall thickness of 0.16. Well, I tossed that around but I like that it is not too big of a diameter and I can basically route it as it was originally.

While I was mulling this over I found a good price for an "original" plastic hose- same part number in a Land Rover bag.

When I pulled it out and laid to next to my OEM hose--- which is still very flexible and did not break when I had to pull it out of its tortuous path- I find that the bends of the new "original" are nowhere close to the OEM. I tried many different paths so it would lay unstressed behind the alternator, but no joy.

Is this a superseded number and do the later 2001,2002's have the plastic reservoir return hose go a different route then my 2000? I could not find one.

I am tempted to say it was a nice experiment and I have no idea how these replacement plastic hoses fit and just install my .11 wall thickness silicone hose.

Any thoughts on installing a hose with a 0.11 wall thickness versus spending more money to buy the 0.16 wall thickness hose?

https://i.imgur.com/uSUzSgr.jpg

[img]https://i.imgur.com/uSUzSgr.jpg[/img]

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Joined: Mar 22 2016
Posts: 1112

I would of thought that there was no change in the route between 99 and 2002, but it’s a Range Rover so who knows.
I’m wondering lhd v rhd would there be a difference ?

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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The top hose in the photo is my OEM hose--you can see that the bottom one does not have the elevation change or any bends which match the OEM hose.

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Joined: Dec 30 2015
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I would think you won't have a problem with the thinner walled hose. It's not like it running at any huge pressure. I suspect the first lot I bought that has been on my car for about 3 years (which for me is over 60,000 miles) is the thinner walled stuff the same as you have. When I ordered the second lot they said they didn't have any black or blue but could supply red and that is thicker wall which makes it thicker overall and not as easy to route.

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Joined: Dec 14 2018
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Thanks Gilbert--

I am going to do a single run from the top of the block to the reservoir going behind the alternator and down.

The wall thickness is about max to sneak by the oil filler and even use the original plastic clips. Well until the one around the oil filler tube snapped just by moving it.

I think the hose will not be pinched between the air conditioning compressor based upon a quick test fit I did. The main thing is to get a natural curve off of the block so this flexible hose does not kink.

May need to use some corrugated cable wrap to help maintain the curve off of the block and in areas where the hose is touching hard parts.