rangerovers.pub
The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse.
Member
Joined: Apr 23 2019
Posts: 223

My Monroes are good, IMHO. I have front and rear. As mentioned on. net, i don't trust people re-selling "OEM" stuff and who think you don't need/ deserve to know the manufacturer, especially on a pair of shocks. I'd rather have a name, and know who to blame if it turns out to be shite, although thus far I trust Bearmach as an umbrella brand, even though obviously they don't manufacture all their stuff. But in this case (ie P38 shocks), by the time you've priced up a Bearmach set you may just as well have Monroe.

Member
Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 406

Glad to hear that the Monroes are good.

However after (too much!) mimbling I've decided to go for a set of Bilstiens from Paddock. Twice the price of Monroes but half the price of genuine Land Rover parts. With any luck I shall be able to report back on how they do in a week or so.

Clive

Member
Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 406

Got the full set of yellow Bilsteins from Paddock. Including the steering damper. With a couple or three hundred miles on the clock preliminary assessment is that they are stiffer than what came off and more progressive. Damping increase with larger suspension movements is noticeably more aggressive than standard.

Which may annoy the living daylights out of me when I finally get things sorted.

Its still not right. Stiffer damping seems to be covering up the underlying problem.

If it were conventional car with metal springs I'd say the symptoms point to worn out way too soft springs. But I don't think that's possible on a P38 as spring rate is effectively set by the pressure in the air bags which in turn is defined by the ride height. Way I see it so long as the car can hit and maintain the right ride height there must be enough pressure in the bags. Certainly my three amigos are behaving just fine and waving the tape measure around between arch and wheel centres suggest its about right. A little high perhaps on standard, maybe 1/4 - 3/8", but I'll sort that next time I can get on Mikes nice level barn floor. Best part of my drive puts a canter wise tilt of about 1" across the car so I guess thats close enough for the spacers to work just fine. But its so much easier to play with spacers with a chassis lift instead of futzing with a jack doing one at a time.

Steering isn't happy either. Seems to have picked up a bit of play in the system and car doesn't wan't to run dead true. Time to get my steering box rebuilt so I know I have a decent one fitted instead of that second hand one of unknown history. Local(ish) land Rover guy can get it done for £350. Lot more than the E-Bay exchange mob but it will be the full monty not a wash'n seal jobbie. If I'm going that far hafta wonder if it makes sense to dump a fat £100 into an OEM steering shaft too. I know I tend to dump more money into new parts than most folk but at least then I'm pretty sure it will be right.

Clive

Member
Joined: Jan 16 2016
Posts: 237

The spring rate for an air bag is determined by the profile of the piston part at the bottom. The elasticity of the rubber bladder doesn't set the spring rate. It is the piston going in and out. The air pressure just sets the ride height.

For example, I fitted Arnott Gen III's and, because the piston is machined with a different cross sectional area at each ride height, it has different spring rates compared with Dunlops. They are harder on the motorway and at std height, yet softer off road. Anyway I digress.

Tyre pressures for standard tyres should be 28F/38R. It is very important as I have found and I am running General Grabber AT2's.

Member
Joined: Aug 19 2019
Posts: 29

To be nit picky, the volume of air, not pressure, sets the height. The weight of the vehicle sets the pressure.
I'm also running Gen 3's, and I really like their spring rates, less body roll when cornering on road, and a smoother ride on the rough.

Member
Joined: Sep 14 2016
Posts: 406

Air springs are complicated. I have an inch and a half thick textbook somewhere that barely scratches the surface.

Anyway mine is on standard Dunlop airbags about 20,000 miles old so they should still be behaving fine. What I don't understand is why it has started behaving as if the springing is too soft. Looking back it started misbehaving about 1,000 - 1,500 miles ago and has steadily got worse. Putting the stiffer Bilstein dampers on has done pretty much what I'd expect from trying to control over soft suspension on a steel sprung car by uprating dampers instead of springs.

No leaks. It stays up for over a week when parked and pretty much never takes more than a few seconds to sort itself out ready to drive off regardless of load. Unless I park in just the wrong place with the left hand front wheel in an annoying dip perfectly matched to the tyre radius.

Clive

Member
Joined: Dec 30 2015
Posts: 1603

Probably a silly question but.. how are your roll bars/bushes?

edit: it was a silly question - you've already changed the bushes and links.
Only the bars themselves to go then, but I've never heard of them wearing out/going floppy

Member
Joined: Jan 16 2016
Posts: 237

Harv said:

To be nit picky, the volume of air, not pressure, sets the height. The weight of the vehicle sets the pressure

Yes, you are right Harv. That is a better way of explaining it.

Member
Joined: Jan 16 2016
Posts: 237

Clive, I would forget about the General Grabber recommended tyre pressures and stick to the factory 28F/38R.
Are you on 255/65/R16 tyres?
May not solve all your problems but should be an improvement.