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As the title says should new exhaust manifold studs (TE110051L) be coated in anti-seize or a high temp locking compound like Loctite? The internet seams to contradict itself on this subject. I'm asking b/c I'm in the process of replacing my catalytic converts as they were stolen (cut out).

I've not located in RAVE the correct stud bolt torque value if anybody has that though I'm sure I'll find it here soon enough.

Off topic, but could threaded rod cut to length and bolts on each end work just as well?

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Nothing. You could put anti-seize if you like, it might make getting them out easier once the nuts have seized onto the studs so the whole stud unscrews. You could use lengths of M10 threaded rod or even M10 bolts if you wanted. Torque setting is in RAVE, Section 06, page 6, 22 ft/lb (or 30Nm if your torque wrench is in metric).

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Not really an answer to your question but I bought a stack of generic exhaust studs a couple of years back for a stationary engine I was rebuilding.
They were high tensile steel and copper plated. The copper plating seems to be pretty standard for exhaust studs. Why? corrosion resistance? easier to get them out again? I don't know.

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Thank you Gilbert, I see it there now.

Dav3d, yeah, that was exactly what prompted my threaded rod question - after someone mentioned just using threaded rod and it working fine it made me wonder if these studs were not as special as I had presumed. The steel OEM studs were fused to the bolts and came out as a unit but the replacements are (I think) zinc plated. We will see in 10 - 20 years which has held up better.

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Studs with brass nuts. Never had an issue getting them undone.

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Can't help feeling the heat would see off the Loctite. I use anti-sieze, copper for iron, aluminium for alloy.

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I would certainly use anti-seize on those studs. The heat cycling there definitely makes them more susceptible to corrosion.
This seems counter productive, but it's what I do (some of you may laugh); I put anti-seize and loctite in such places. The anti-seize still does it's job. The loctite doesn't do it's job as well as on a clean stud, but it still hardens and provides some locking for the nut.

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i put nickle anti seize on both, i don't care if they undo from the head or the nut as long as they come undone . use stainless steel as a thread stock for studs and brass nuts if you can get them . i wouldn't use zinc or galvo i think they react with the aluminium

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On marine engines --- which have a harsh life of constant immersion in sea water --- we use stainless steel studs and copper nuts --- never an issue to remove 👍 zinc /steel cause electrylic reaction which is bad news

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And why can't car manufacturers do the same thing? There really should be leglisation on the minimum life of new cars.

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There is, 10 years. Manufacturers are legally obliged to provide support for 10 years from the last date a model is produced. So spares support for the P38 should have ended in 2012 but it's a testament to LRs commitment that they still support them.

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It used to be 10 years, I'm sure I read somewhere that more recently that's been changed to 5 years.

Total joke that manufacturers are only required to produce parts for cars that are 5 years past the end of production.

David.

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It isn't only producing parts but it's also what they produce. I was told recently about someone that wanted a set of big end shells for a modern engine, a Ford I think, and was told you can't buy them. In fact, you can't buy any engine internals as the thinking is that if it is worn out you either buy a complete new engine or just scrap the car and buy a new one.

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Even 10 years is pants. My cars both ended production in 2001 and I see no need to "upgrade" to something more modern just to keep up with the Joneses. They also run on LPG so they're vastly cleaner running that they were when new. Had I joined the Car Finance rat race instead of buying my Jeep I'd have probably leased 4 cars by now. How is that cleaner or greener?
The whole "new stuff is greener" message is Marketing Bullshit (tautology there) and leads to landfill full of white goods, smartphones, PCs, TVs, DFS sofas and all the other consumer tat with which we surround ourselves. If Mr Chippendale could make a chair that lasted 300 years where have we gone wrong since?

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Manufacturers regard cars as white goods these days. I was talking to someone who works for Tata, not the car division thankfully, and he asked why I run a 20+ year old Range Rover when my local dealer would no doubt give me a good deal on a new or nearly new Evoque? I pointed out that the Evoque doesn't have a separate chassis, a V8 petrol engine that could be converted to LPG and can't tow 3.5 tonnes. He wandered off looking very puzzled. But it isn't as bad as people that buy a car through Cazoo or Cinch without having seen it or driven it......

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In some ways, buying a car through Cinch or Cazoo if you're not even remotely interested in cars is quite a clever move.

They are massively governed by distance selling regulations and you also have time to highlight the faults. You can have a proper look around it on your own driveway rather than having a salesman breathing down your neck. You can have an unaccompanied test drive in areas you know and you can even have your own friendly mechanic check it over.

If there are any issues at all you can call them up and tell them to come and get it so I can see why people would use those avenues, especially during lockdown. It also saves you dragging kids around car showrooms.

It's not something I'd consider but can understand why people would.

David.

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I know they say you have a money back guarantee and assume this is down to the distance selling regulations. If "I don't like it" is a valid reason for getting your money back in full, it's cheaper than getting a hire car for a few days.......

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Under DSR, "I don't like it" IS a valid reason for 14 days.

My cousin married a guy who moved from being some big cheese at BMW UK to being a bigger cheese at Jeep UK. He saw me driving my Cherokee and gave me the usual "Oh, you should call me I'm sure I can do you a great deal on a new Grand Cherokee". He was very confused when I said thanks but no thanks. Ultimately the only argument he had against my current car was "but, it's OLD - I can get you a NEW one".
Needing a new car didn't seem to be in question.

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You only have to see all these new cars in holding pounds 100s of them ----- my 1962 ford is column change 3 speed vacuum wipers if it needs fixing a screwdriver and some spanners usually enough gets 35mpg too no tax or not £100 for insurance it's got style and always gathers interested people so nope keep your modern gadget soul less plastic trash

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My mate in Liverpool deals in used motorhomes now, in the past he's been a used car dealer. In both cases he's had people buy one but come back just before a couple of weeks are up saying they want their money back having put over a 1000 miles on the clock. He told them he'd charge them a rental and cleaning fee, in some cases this has led to solicitors exchanging letters but as far as I know he came out on top.

I've never had it but I wonder how I would fare if I converted a vehicle to LPG for someone and a couple of weeks later they returned and asked for the system to be removed and their money back - I imagine I could charge them for the labour but have to refund the cost of components?