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The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse
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I'll own up and admit I very nearly bought one exactly the same as that (yes, an Orvis with real leather and wood that somehow the Yanks manage to make look like plastic), except it didn't have the scrapes on the front or the mangled filler flap. But I decided that at £800 it was too expensive so over 4 grand is just plain silly.

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So, you probably don't want this one either?

https://tinyurl.com/y872kgmg

:D

Although, to be fair, it's a much nicer example

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Have a read of the description and note the badges. This guy should change his user name to Confused of Wales......

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/NISSAN-NAVARRO/265025055850

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Shouldn't that be CONFUSED OF WALES!

The only bit that looks like a Land Rover bit to me other than the badges is the front grille. At least its an earlier one and not one of the snapped chassis range (though the MOT history suggests its starting to suffer with corrosion as well, and suggests whilst it was sat off road for some time, not as long as 12 years).

My guess would be its been involved in a prang and repaired with whatever was to hand at the time rather than the correct bits?

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Looks to me like a Disco 3 grille, bumper and headlights. I like the way the grille doesn't even fit and the LR badges everywhere, including on the steering wheel.

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Yeah if the airbag ever goes off thats going straight into the drivers face was my thoughts on the steering wheel one. The real question is just why though? The replacement for the battery strap is also another highlight of the thing. I think the arch extensions look like they have been added as well, and the handle on the boot with the LR badge above the numberplate does look like its off a Disco. The real question is why anyone would even do that....

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Having read through this thread I am sorry to see you guys don't seem to like the 2.5 diesel. Well, I don't care because I have a 2001 DHSE which is a real HSE version. And I like it - a lot. So there 😆 😆 😆 - ha ha ha ha ha ha.

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The problem with the big engines is that here in Ireland we have to pay road tax based on engine horse power, and engine size, and the big engines cost around €3000 a year. Even the 2.5 diesel is €1200, but is affordable as a weekend adventurer - just. Although this year it cos me €2800 to put it through the annual road test. Unfortunately, I am not great at DIY repairs. I can do the basics but I am no good when it gets to things like using a Nanocom, or stripping the EAS, so I have to employ the services of a guy I know who repairs classics. He is very good, and he does keep the hourly charges down, but it still costs if it has to go to him.

Fortunately, things like replacing seals, door handles and less difficult stuff like that I can do in the drive, but I don't have a garage to work in. I have the "booklet" icon on the heater control display but, and I know people will be critical, despite having read lots about it I am still not sure how to repair it. I bought a repaired HEVAC unit from Marty which solved a lack of display pixels, and also the fan speed control, and replacing that was straight forward, but trying to get at the mechanical controls behing the centre console looks like a big job, perhaps bigger than I can consider.

The other real issue now is that, with Brexit, the cost of importing parts has jumped - a lot. If you want to import a complete vehicle I think that it is almost unaffordable compared to what it was pre-Brexit. Previously, you bought the vehicle, drove it to Ireland, went to the car test centre and paid something called Vehicle Registration Tax, which is based on the original new car selling price. As an example, I bought my RR P38 for £6000, and paid €1700 in VRT when I imported it.

But now, after Brexit, I would have to pre-pay 21% VAT, 10% import duty, and the original VRT. And provide documentation about the origin of the parts. In theory the seller shouldn't charge VAT but that could also be an issue, and as far as I know you can't retrospectively claim back UK VAT if you live outside the UK. So that means you are paying two lots of VAT, although there may be a dispensation of not paying the 10% import duty if you can prove that the vehicle is mostly [probably over 80%] UK manufactured parts.

The used car trade between the UK and Ireland was a very big part of the Irish second-hand car market but I would think that it is currently dead in the water now. I think there were something like 110,000 second-hand vehicles imported into Ireland in 2019, mostly by private individuals, but also a lot by motor dealers themselves, especially Mercs, BMW, and Audi's. I suspect the dealers were buying mostly ex-PCP [is that the correct terminology?] stock from big dealers in the UK, like Arnold Clark.

Another unexpected issue is the idea that Ireland will achieve something like 50% of car sales to be EV's in three years time, which would include used vehicle. But guess where almost all second hand EV's are sourced from - you guessed it - the UK. Original Irish registered EV's are quite limited, and expensive, in comparison to imported ex-UK cars. For instance, a two year old Jaguar I-Pace in the UK could be about £35,000 from a dealer [perhaps a bit less], but the very same car in Ireland will cost closer to €65,000 - €70,000.

It is difficult to know how much import duty, and VRT, you will have to pay as well, because although the Irish revenue department have a look-up list for VRT costs they don't have listings for electric versions in most cases, and they don't have any listings for Tesla [or they didn't as of two weeks ago]. So if you import a Tesla you could be charged pretty well anything that revenue feel is suitable, a bit like the guy from Manila had explained in a post earlier for importing into the Philippines.

Lastly, LPG was a big thing in Ireland about 15 years ago. Just about every taxi in Dublin used LPG but it never really gained any great support, and I don't know whether there are many garages in Ireland still selling, commercially, LPG on the forecourt. I have heard of people filling their LPG tanks from home heating tanks, but I don't know if that is just hearsay.

Anyway, I still like my DHSE, so there, although I see the day in the not too distant future when it will just be left in the drive as a nice place to sit in the summer, because the repair costs are too high and no one will buy it - except, perhaps, for our friend in Manila.

Pierre3.

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ooh, more second hand cars in the UK - Goody!! :)

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Most of the I-Pace in the UK are circa £40k and upwards and if you want an HSE with a decent spec they're nearer £50k and up.

If you're exporting a car from the UK, can you claim the 20% VAT back on them when they leave the country?

If I start doing big miles again after lockdown, I'd happily buy an I-Pace though, they're a cracking car. I loved the one I drove.

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Bollocks!!!! I've just spent the best part of an hour explaining how the import system should work, how Brexit is being used as an excuse to make money for couriers and how it did, does and should work with moving cars in and out of EU. Only to find a bad token error when I tried to post it as it had timed out and I've lost the lot.

I have only one further thing to add, Testiculi ad Brexitum

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Pierre3 wrote:

Lastly, LPG was a big thing in Ireland about 15 years ago. Just about every taxi in Dublin used LPG but it never really gained any great support, and I don't know whether there are many garages in Ireland still selling, commercially, LPG on the forecourt. I have heard of people filling their LPG tanks from home heating tanks, but I don't know if that is just hearsay.

Anyway, I still like my DHSE, so there, although I see the day in the not too distant future when it will just be left in the drive as a nice place to sit in the summer, because the repair costs are too high and no one will buy it - except, perhaps, for our friend in Manila.

Pierre3.

On the LPG front I was over there around 4 years ago, and found LPG was very scarce on forecourts. There were a few places then, but literally a handful of them. Over the border in the North, there was a fair few forecourts with it. Here upto late last summer, it was fairly easy to find. The last 6 months or so has seen Shell remove around 200 locations, and now a load more appear to be at the point where they need work of some description (tank life reached at a guess) and its unclear if they are going to replace them or just remove them. At one point within 30 miles of me there was around 25-30 stations. Thats now down to 5, with a further 4 currently out of order.

The Irish equivilent of VED is insane and has been commented on to mean you rarely see vehicles there that are commonplace elsewhere.

The only diesel I've been in was as a passenger, and it seemed a bit gutless and noisy. Though that might be an indication of what sort of state that particular one was in rather than a good example (certainly seeing the cloud that comes out of the exhaust when it does start suggests all is not well with it).

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David, this is a small selection of two used, and one new, I-Pace's for sale today, in Ireland. There are about 20 cars or so for sale in the country at the moment from what I can see.
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I believe that if the UK dealer is VAT registered then you can ask for the VAT to be deducted from the invoice price, but I don't think that it is compulsory, I have read that it depends on how much business the selling company does. It is the same problem that UK buyers have when buying from EU sellers. If a company in Germany, for instance, sells goods to UK buyers then that company has to register with UK HMRC to not charge VAT [or something like that], and the problem is that if the German company is only selling a limited number of items into the UK then they won't bother registering in the UK, and they will just charge German VAT and the UK buyer will then also pay VAT again in the UK when it arrives.

All in all, a complete dogs dinner. It is just the same as it was 25 years ago when exports all had to ship to a "foreign" country under customs forms T1, T2, T3 or a Carnet Passage. I spent nearly twenty years driving around Europe in the 60's and 70's and these were the normal paperwork requirements. Now we are back to that, just under a different name. As I mentioned earlier it has made a bit hit to the Irish government's idea of mass EV ownership due to cutting off the most prolific right-hand drive, used car market.

Brian, one really bad result of Irish VRT [VED] is that you get different models of cars in Ireland than you do in the UK. The most obvious example is air conditioning. You very, very, very rarely come across an original Irish car, for instance E-class Mercs, that have both A/C and sunroofs. This is because tax is payable on any extra's on a car. As the sunroof on a Merc or a BMW is normally an extra then tax is charged on that item, usually making the sunroof cost about €2500 extra. Again, you can't buy a Lexus IS300H Premier in Ireland because with all the bits fitted to the Premier compared to the middle level model it becomes far too expensive. Extra's like different 18 inch alloy wheels, drop-down rear seats, rear passing sensors, etc. etc.

I know because I imported a Premier two years ago. It even has light-up "Lexus" door sill panels.

It has always been the case in Ireland that you need real vested interests to get anything accepted by the public. Diesel was only really pushed here because of the number of people who drove from Dublin to Cork, or Limerick, or Galway, and the cost og petrol was rising rapidly. It was also taken up in huge numbers by taxi's simply because, in Ireland, diesel is quite a bit cheaper than petrol, unlike in the UK where the opposite is true.

LPG was the very same, but fuel distributors didn't roll out a network because it was predominently used by taxis in Dublin and Cork, but very little by anyone else.

Just as an exercise one should look up this Tesla and read the description. It is almost certainly a UK import as you couldn't buy a Tesla in Ireland in 2015.

enter image description here

I would have to agree with Brian that the diesel 2.5 struggles a bit, and yes it is a bit noisy under acceleration, but I don't do many long journeys so I don't mind too much. Like any 2 or 3 litre diesel that I have ever had [ 3 Isuzu Troopers LWB's and a Mitsubishi Pajero LWB, 2 Golf diesel vans] when you give the RR full throttle it does tend to be a little bit smoky but that tends to be the EGR valve being messy. I find that using a diesel fuel cleaner additive usually solves the problem. It may be that I will need to fit a new EGR valve eventually, but provided I give it a run every now and again, and flooring the accelerator every now and again while on a run, it will keep things pretty clean. Cetainly clean enough to pass the strict emmissions test in Ireland.

Pierre3.

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Pierre3 wrote:

I believe that if the UK dealer is VAT registered then you can ask for the VAT to be deducted from the invoice price, but I don't think that it is compulsory, I have read that it depends on how much business the selling company does.

That applies if you are buying parts and the likes of Island4x4, Rimmers and LRDirect who regularly supply parts to customers in the US will be well aware of this. The price you pay is the VAT free price as the VAT will be paid at the customers end. So for you to buy parts from the UK, the prices should be no different to what they were before. If they are, then it is either the courier or your Government who are profiteering. Or, more likely, they are charging on everything whether they should be or not as nobody really understands the rules as yet and are erring on the cautious side. For imports into the EU there should be no tax or VAT to be paid on anything with a value of less than £39 or €43 (think buying crap from China on eBay) so in theory, depending on the carriage charges, it should be cheaper buying your bits in smaller orders rather than one big one. A company, or individual, has to register for VAT if their annual turnover exceeds £85,000 so most will be although buying stuff privately might cause the VAT to be added to a price.

Difference with buying a car is that there is no VAT on a secondhand car. VAT is paid on a new car or a secondhand commercial vehicle, but not on a used car. So even if the supplying dealer is VAT registered (which they will be), they don't charge VAT on the price. You could always argue (as I will be doing in the very near future on a car I am buying from an EU country) that the VAT was paid into the EU pot at a time when the UK was in the EU when the car was new so shouldn't be liable to be paid again.

It is the same problem that UK buyers have when buying from EU sellers. If a company in Germany, for instance, sells goods to UK buyers then that company has to register with UK HMRC to not charge VAT [or something like that], and the problem is that if the German company is only selling a limited number of items into the UK then they won't bother registering in the UK, and they will just charge German VAT and the UK buyer will then also pay VAT again in the UK when it arrives.

EU rules are that anything supplied for export out of the EU does not have to have VAT charged on it. VAT is collected on behalf of a Government by a retailer. The retailer buy in stock, pays VAT on that stock but then claims it back from the Government. When he sells that stock, he charges the customer VAT and passes that on to the Government. Anything he sells for export does not have VAT added and he simply marks it on his VAT return as having been exported. So they don't need to register in another country as the payment and claim is within his own country. I used to import excise items from outside the EU (so had to register for VAT with HMRC irrespective of turnover). I paid no VAT or local taxes on the items, I paid no VAT on the carriage charges, even though using a UK based haulier because the journey commenced outside the EU but I then charged VAT, which had to be paid to HMRC when I sold the items, I had one customer in Poland and had to charge him VAT just the same as any other EU customer but had I sent anything outside the EU there would have been no VAT charged and any taxes were paid at the receiving end.

All in all, a complete dogs dinner. It is just the same as it was 25 years ago when exports all had to ship to a "foreign" country under customs forms T1, T2, T3 or a Carnet Passage.

It's similar but not the same as the UK will be the only place not EU so you only need the paperwork to cross between UK and EU or vice versa. Once on the other side of the Channel and back into civilisation, there's no borders or checkpoints.

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There are quite a lot of VAT qualifying second hand cars available.

My Dad was looking at a LWB L405 SVAutobiography last year that was VAT Qualifying. It depends who it was registered to when it was new. As a huge number of I-Pace’s are going to be registered to fleet customers there’s a good chance that when the used ones start coming to the market they’ll be VAT qualifying.

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Yes, that's the loophole or oddity. If registered when new to a VAT registered company as a business asset, then VAT will be charged on it if it is sold by a VAT registered dealer. If it is bought by a company or individual that isn't VAT registered, then it no longer is VAT qualifying, it is just a used car.

Daft thing with VAT is the only person that pays it is the end buyer. A manufacturer is charged VAT on the raw materials, which he claims back, he them turns those materials into a product and charges VAT on that when he sells it and hands that VAT to HMRC so the VAT is being claimed back and refunded to HMRC all the time until it arrives with the non-VAT registered end user who simply pays it.

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Pierre3 wrote:

Anyway, I still like my DHSE, so there, although I see the day in the not too distant future when it will just be left in the drive as a nice place to sit in the summer, because the repair costs are too high and no one will buy it - except, perhaps, for our friend in Manila.

Pierre3.

Looks to be in nice nick, but not for me.

One, you can't import anything RHD.

Two, it's a DERV burner.

Three, it'd cost more in bribes, sorry, tea money, than the vehicle's worth!

But thanks for the thought. :-)

Here there's no mention of EV's and there's hardly any hybrids around either. They are way too expensive to gain traction at the moment and then there's the issue of the (lack of) reliability of power supply. Chances are, you'd plug it in at night and in the morning find that Meralco has sucked every last squiggly amp out of it!

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That's the problem with electric, it can flow both ways. I wonder how long you could run a house for on a Nissan Leaf?

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It's not that far away. The Sweet Lord Elon (our Musk and Saviour) has decreed that Teslas will be able to act as demand smoothing energy banks while plugged in. They do have what I believe scientists refer to as "Ferkin HUGE" batteries so once there are tens of thousands of them hooked up to the grid overnight they could make quite a difference if they're not going anywhere the next day.

I'm very disappointed with the LPG situation in the UK. It had the potential to be a very swift way to reduce emissions but I think the bottom line is that it came before people really cared. By the time people DID care, the fun tech was electric and honestly - looking at the latest crop of cars - they're really very fancy indeed now. A Tesla S in some forms can do 0-60 in 1.9 seconds 200mph and manage a range of over 350 miles (at motorway speeds of course) then recharge in 20 minutes while I have a piss and a pie. I can't really argue against that anymore - even if it costs £85k.

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Morat wrote:

A Tesla S in some forms can do 0-60 in 1.9 seconds 200mph and manage a range of over 350 miles (at motorway speeds of course) then recharge in 20 minutes while I have a piss and a pie. I can't really argue against that anymore - even if it costs £85k.

But can it tow a 3.5 tonne trailer?

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https://www.tesla.com/en_gb/powerwall

for giggles