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The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse.
BlackSpeed66's Avatar
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Jul 03 2018
11 August 2019 - 04:15

On mine here in the states it is to the left of the steering wheel. Drop the knee panel, try not to rip the little duct vent off.... it is held with a bracket kind of below/behind where the small wood trim is. One or two 8mm bolts and it and the red inverter relay should drop out the bottom.

17 October 2018 - 22:43

Just stopping in to say hello and join the madness! Had my ‘02 for just over a year now and still loving it! Pics below....

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02 April 2019 - 21:30

I apologize in advance... this is a really silly question ... but I’ve been searching through my service manual and looking through various websites online...

How is the flat cover above the spare tire well removed? I see many photos online with them out of the vehicle, but can’t seem to find how it’s secured or hinged to the body.... aside from a few small philips head screws. Is there a spring or a tab that needs to be released? Or do I need to give it a firm pull to release it? Or is it actually screwed in with those small brackets? Just trying to avoid breaking more of the already delicate interior bits!

Thanks!

03 April 2019 - 22:27

Thanks much fellas! At least that was an easy one!

10 April 2019 - 00:16

Got the spare cover out without incident. Turns out there is a small plastic cylinder at each end that locks into the metal pegs on the body, but allows the cover to pivot up and down. At any rate, I finally got a proper set of cargo tie-downs installed! They are folding ones from an LR3.

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12 April 2019 - 01:30

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Yep the tie downs have to be drilled out since they’re M8 and the threaded inserts the P38 has are M10. Need about a half dozen fender washers to space them level with the thick floor padding!

04 August 2019 - 17:41

Hello all,

I had stopped in to the local dealer last week in attempt to have a VIN cut valet key ordered for my rig. Unfortunately the poor fellow behind the keyboard was unable to come up with any number to put the order through. Does anyone know if there is a specific part number associated with the “fob-less” valet key? Or do I simply ask them to “make a key” since the fob versions are supposedly unobtainium here in the States now?

06 August 2019 - 21:23

Thanks for the help folks. I will inquire for more details next time I head over to the dealer.

06 August 2019 - 21:16

Yeah I’ve been “straddling” the two forums here for a few months now, but I think I will be frequenting ‘The Pub’ more often now!

What a shame...

Off to drown my sorrows with a glass of Glendronach.

08 August 2019 - 22:00

In less than a month I am about to try my hand at some proper trails here in Ohio for the first time, courtesy of a local LR club. I’ve had my truck for just over two years and it has not been the nightmare the rest of the Internet would lead one to believe. I just hope, as a noobie to both off roading and the P38.... nothing from next month’s event will upset that! Trying to go around and complete any maintenance and address any potential failure points... also carrying a spare air spring for each axle as a just in case. Compressor and valve block were just serviced by me in the last 6 months. Otherwise, the truck has done everything I’ve asked it to do so far and I couldn’t be more pleased!

10 August 2019 - 22:09

As another fellow from the US, welcome! I also have a thing for vintage audio gear. Haven’t taken a dive into vinyl yet as that would be yet another hobby to throw money at! Currently running some solid-state Harman/Kardon Citation gear from the 70s plus some JBL L166s. At 150watts a side, it rocks pretty well haha.

10 August 2019 - 22:20

Yep, for me the P38 is a third vehicle. The e34 wagon is the daily driver (possibly the best car ever made by BMW - Toyota be damned, haha). And I have converted that one from an auto to a manual. If I need to get somewhere quickly, the e30 with its engine swap does so quite nicely! As someone who’s been DIY wrenching on Euro cars since I could drive (37 now), I figured if I can manage both a trans swap and an engine swap, I can handle a P38. It goes all of the places the other two cars can’t. And towing capacity is a plus!

13 August 2019 - 02:20

I didn’t want to hijack the other thread.... but I had mentioned in it that I will be going on my first off-pavement adventure in about a month. I’ve had my truck for about 2 years.... it has 167k miles on it currently. In that time, for general peace of mind (and eventual off road prep), I’ve changed the drive belt, diff fluid, trans filter/Xfer case fluid, rebuilt the EAS compressor and valve block. I’ve also replaced various cooling and vacuum hoses, plus a brake accumulator along the way. As of this past weekend, I have now flushed/bled the brakes, and have now replaced the radiator and thermostat along with fresh coolant. U joints do not appear to exhibit any play or odd movements. Mechanically, I feel the truck is about in as good a shape as it can be in. Granted, it was fairly well kept to begin with.

For spare parts, I will be taking the usual fluids, plus a spare drive belt, water pump, some hoses and the old T stat, a spare ignition coil, crank sensor, and I have spare air springs and spare air compressor, plus spare air spring hardware. Also some spare U joints. I have done the “one wheel” test to confirm the viscous clutch appears to be working. I also have a Nanocom, plus a Bluetooth OBDII scanner that gives me live data on my phone for any diagnostic needs.

For the purposes of taking it off pavement, I’ve added some front recovery points, factory brush and lamp guards, Terrafirma rock sliders, front diff/axle guard, and a rear diff guard. More protection would be nice, but as we know the aftermarket is limited, and my fabrication skills are lacking. I have obtained some 16” alloy wheels with Cooper Discoverer STT Pros (about 31”) for enhanced traction. The truck is currently riding on Bilstein shocks with what I believe to be are Arnott Gen II air springs. I bought it this way. Not sure how I feel about the Bilstein shocks, but the air springs at least appear to be in good shape but of unknown age. I try to wipe the bladders down whenever I’m under the truck to prevent any unwanted abrasions. Over the past few months I have acquired a complete set of new Gen III air springs. Was saving these as spares until one of the current ones decided to pop. But with the upcoming trip, I’m wondering if I would be better served to swap all of the new ones in? I just don’t know how kind the terrain will be to the current air springs.

I guess the point of all of my rambling is.... what else would you folks do? I have a small amount of generic off road experience as a passenger... but I’m interested to see if anyone has any P38 specific tips or driving techniques - both on the trail and anything else that might help me prep for my little adventure here. Fortunately I will be going with a local LR club... but I will likely be the only P38 present.

Cheers!

13 August 2019 - 23:30

Thanks for the tips and advice guys. Yes, I plan on making a fuel stop and topping off once I reach the town near the park area. It’s been awhile since I’ve been to southern Ohio, but from what I remember it’s mostly trees, brush, with the occasional heavy foresty area. It will likely be mostly dirt trails with some rocky and muddy areas. I’m guessing not too much wide open space but I could be wrong since I have not been to this park before. I believe there are several shallow water crossings too.

As far as an EKA code, since mine is NAS, it may not have one from what I’ve read. I think I tried looking up once with the Nanocom but didn’t find anything.

If there is an open area where we’re at, I may take some time to mess with the gearing and the ‘manual to see how they interact - if I can find a safe area to do so. I have browned through my owners manual a bit in the section at the end. I will take a second look for some light reading here again haha.

Would you recommend leaving the front sway bar/anti roll bar connected as it is? I don’t know if disconnecting one end of it gives much gains in articulation? Maybe it’s a dumb question, but figured I’d toss it out there since it was on my mind.

04 April 2019 - 23:45

That condenser appears to be a newer style “parallel flow” condenser. It operates in a slightly different fashion than the older conventional serpentine or tube & fin designs. They do appear to have the added benefit of being more efficient given the additional surface area due to the design of the cooling passages and the way the refrigerant flows through. I have one in my e34 Touring, and one will also be installed in my post-engine-swap e30 here in the near future.

13 August 2019 - 22:59

I had a similar problem on mine a few months back with the spring rains here. I had pulled up the floor cover for the spare and noticed condensation on the underside of it. Pulled the spare and sure enough, there was some water in the tire well. I decided to look at the hatch seal.... and had stumbled upon a recall item for it. The recall notice was much older and it appeared to have been done at some point. I had noticed after a rain that there was water actually sitting on the mating surface of the hatch opening rubber that frames the entire gate opening. I began pulling it off and noticed there were a few areas where the sheet metal appeared slightly deformed and bent inward. I bent it back out carefully with some pliers and vise grips wrapped in a rag to prevent scratching and put the weatherstrip back on. To date, it appears to be dry in the spare tire well.

My thinking is possibly that with these trucks being as old as they are.... overly “aggressive” shutting of the upper and/or lower gates may deform the sheet metal framing the weatherstrip fits onto. Over time, with the rubber aging it too begins to flatten and becomes less pliable.... potentially creating a small gap, and allowing water to seep in where it shouldn’t.