rangerovers.pub
The only place for a coil spring is up Zebedee's arse.
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Apr 23 2019
27 November 2019 - 21:14

Sure, it cd very well be something like fuel pressure that causes it, but whatever it is, be it that, or injectors etc it only happens at 60+. Running fuel temp is normally 30-40 degrees, mainly driven by temp of fuel in the tank, heated a bit when it arrives in the engine bay, and cooled by ram air. The heating of the fuel rail after shut down is driven primarily by radiation from the engine, rather than ambient temp. My engine was running over 100 before I reworked the cooling system, yours was probably a good 5-10 degrees cooler with the super duper Direnza rad. Anyhow it's definitely a thing, I have sat and watched the fuel temp rise on nanocom to 60+ degrees, 15 mins after shut-down and it will not restart. If I restart in the 50s ie less than 15 mins, or waiting longer for the fuel rail to cool off then there's no re-start issue.

V possibly I have no issue any longer, fingers crossed

27 November 2019 - 19:17

Well, I got the filter off, finally. Pulled every trick in the book... and didn't burn anyone/ anything. In the end I put an induction coil over the fuel union (with an extinguisher close to hand) and heated it until the canister was hot to touch (I bottled it, the induction heater will make it red hot in seconds) - nada.... Dremelled out one side of the nut on the filter housing - nada... induction heated the nut again, and slowly, reluctantly the union then came undone. I chopped open the filter and it was predictably crispy and black. So hopefully this will help the fuel pressure. Also, having replaced the rad the cooling system is running 5+ degrees cooler. That means the rail takes less heat once the engine has turned off - at 60 degrees+ on the fuel rail it will fail a restart. After 15 mins of standing the fuel rail temp was approaching 60 degrees, but now the heating up process should take longer, or maybe not even get there, as the block cools down.
I'll keep my eye on it. I also have a reflective fibre-glass wrap to add to the fuel rail if necessary.

27 November 2019 - 21:57

Does the battery have a good charge? Cd it be that the alternator has stopped charging properly since you changed it?

27 November 2019 - 21:58

Trickle charge overnight, to be sure?

29 November 2019 - 17:32

Sorry, i know this has run on a long time.... Fuel pressures: now that the filter's sorted I did another test: 26 psi at idle ( not fully warmed up though), 32 if I pull the vacuum line, and 48 if I block the return ( perhaps I did a better job than last time). So that says to me that the fuel pump is OK (phew). Is that normal for the FPR too?
I suppose I can run the same test on my 4.0 if no-one else has their data to hand. I think I'll go clean the injectors next

01 December 2019 - 21:27

Bin the HU, put the right harness in, and an after-market stereo, and never look back...

01 December 2019 - 21:58

I get a vaguely nauseous/ "not fresh air" smell coming from my HVAC. I think it's more heat associated than with the AC, which makes me think that the outside of the heater matrix might need a rinse. I redid the o rings in the summer, but was on AC for months, and only recently started to require heat. It was quite unpleasant at first, and is becoming less noticeable now. I have no reason to think the matrix is leaking. I'm not too hot on the HVAC anatomy, but does anyone know of any good ways to clean the outside of the matrix? There are various "bombs" available on the market - anyone found a good one? If i wanted to do a more physical clean is that going to be a dash-off job, or is there a pathway to getting an aerosol solvent directly into the heater box via one of the vents?

02 December 2019 - 19:30

Drains are clear, I think. Certainly the "flowers" above the gearbox are, or can a blockage develop internally? I poked it with a length of plastic tube anyway, and I didn't get covered. Anyway, I think the issue is not with the a/c, it's the heater core, I think.
It doesn't smell sweet/ like coolant, although my sense of smell is rubbish, it's more of a "burning plastic" type feeling, more than a smell.
I changed out the pollen filters today, which were damp and a little black in places, after less than a year. Both fans are working full bore.
So, can anyone think of a way to clean /rinse the matrix short of stripping it out.
Prior to changing the rad the "feeling" getting bad wd often coincide with a hevac service book symbol. But in nanocom there wd never be any fault reported. Does hevac have a max temp on the heater core? I wonder if the core being "too" hot wd throw a service book error and at the same time that extra heat was burning something off?

03 December 2019 - 02:20

I'm just a bit wary of putting in something that the blowers might not like, Richard.? The other option I just thought about is to put my borehole camera into the heater core temp sensor hole for inspection, and maybe then rinse out that way?

03 December 2019 - 02:26

Unless you insist on putting sticking plasters on a 20yo HU, then the right Incartec harness plus 21st century after-market HU is the way to go Imho. Via Bluetooth you can make phone calls, play the music on your phone, and get satnav directions, all fully integrated, and DAB

03 December 2019 - 10:55

ah no, you're right - I was thinking of the one that plugs in lower down - which is for the evaporator, so that's not going to work

03 December 2019 - 22:50

I have a weep of compressor oil which find its way out past the clutch. From time to time I have to clean the clutch gap to ensure the clutch engages when it should. It's workable, but replacing what's probably just one seal will give me on less thing to maintain. Has anyone ripped one of these babies apart/ replaced the seals?

04 December 2019 - 20:57

Do you mean the one that is held to its wire by "claws" ?

04 December 2019 - 12:54

Thanks Clive, I mailed those guys last night. According to you tube you need to take the front cover off in order to be able to drift out the seal around the main shaft. Still looks do-able, but as you say, it's all about the seals. Sanden seem to be on 7th generation now, ours was series 3. I mailed the guys you linked last night, will see what they say, and they're v close to me too.

05 December 2019 - 14:30

David and I have been conversing off-line, hence my head start. I forgot to tell him when recommending rr.pub that he will be burned at the stake here if he is on coils :o

05 December 2019 - 13:08

Welcome David. David's dropped in from Hawaii - he has a 1998 4.6L. Unless Bolt pops up he won't have Nanocom access any time soon. Agree on fuel... hit the schrader valve on the fuel rail, covered by a rag, and check you have pressure; check all the multi-plugs you see are connected (esp TPS/ IACV on the plenum, and ECT on the nose of the engine. Check the HT leads are firmly on, and that the ignition coil multi-plug (rear RHS of the engine as you view from the front) is all hooked up. I was also thinking CKP/ CPS - the engine cranks but does not fire. So not immobilised. Just need to keep the battery topped up/ trickle charged.
No need to worry about EAS/ cooling system/ air con just yet - in fact i'd almost recommend you send those parts straight back for now, so you don't get sucked into replacing parts for the hell of it (which can make diagnosis even more difficult). The alternator you said looks sick, but once the car's running it's worth testing with a multi-meter to be sure. For later, but is your truck on coils or air bags?

05 December 2019 - 13:42
05 December 2019 - 17:30

Gents - in the vid the rev counter registers nothing even though the engine cranks - should it?

05 December 2019 - 20:12

Maybe just the one I did, but if you press the rubber bushing out you can then use a hacksaw blade to put a relief cut in the outer metal casing of what was the bush. Then get an air chisel and push it out, while at the same time not damaging the panhard rod itself. Its v easy. I still don't own a hydraulic press.
Using the bearing race method for the radius arms is v easy, it just goes down the m12 thread. Minimum hands required